Are You Familiar With Fashion’s Most Impressive Knock-Off Site?

Knock-off merchandise and counterfeit goods have plagued the fashion world for decades. Those of us in New York have simply come to expect the mind-blowing volume of imitation handbags, fragrances and watches that define Canal Street, which tourists flock to it as a status symbol mecca. It's an industry all its own that has thrived on the success of the very brands they imitate, while simultaneously destroying them by dispersing their branding across a mass population. Companies like Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Coach and Rolex have all fought what seems to be a losing battle against such practices for years, while labels with new found fame, such as Givenchy and Celine, are just now starting to understand the age-old wisdom of "'mo money, 'mo problems".

While this is a serious issue with endless social and financial implications, it's one that has seldom affected the niche world of #menswear. On one hand, this has remained true because the brands this community flocks to are too small to even be on the radar of counterfeiters. Someone more prideful of his tastes might also argue that counterfeiting has not plagued #menswear because collectively it does not rely on gimmicky logos and branding to move merchandise and rather on "real shit" like quality and construction.

But as certain #menswear brands have gained popularity and begun to pour over into the world of high-fashion and vice versa, knock-off merchandise has started to surface, particularly on the website Fabrixquare. We're not into snitching, but we would like to bring to your attention that this site is producing the widest variety of fashion and #menswear knock-offs we've ever seen. Sure, obvious counterfeits like Hermes belts and Givenchy tees are likely top-sellers, you'll also find "Rick Owens" sneakers, "Thom Browne" wingtips and, yes, even "Isaia" suits for $129 dollars.

Can we knock the hustle if making imitation swag is hardly a hustle and, more or less, objectively wrong? I'd like to believe it undermines the hard work designers and their colleagues do every single day. And if you're major complaint is that the real thing is too expensive for any "average" person to be able to buy, then you need to wake up and realize that's kind of the point. Fashion is not a democracy. Brands like Rick Owens and Thom Browne are covetable not only because of quality, but because their alienating pricepoints allow them to retain exclusivity. Sites like Fabrixquare not only stand to destroy this dynamic, but also undermine everyone who supports their favorite high-end brands by buying the merchandise through the proper channels. Take a look at Fabrixquare's most noteworthy knock-offs above and decide for yourself.

Jake Woolf is a writer living in New York City. You can read his blog here and follow him on Twitter here.

  • http://twitter.com/mitkoefron Mike M.

    Is it just me or the fakes look prettier than the originals?

    • niggniggnigga

      It’s just you.

    • Jake Woolf

      It’s probably just you. I’m sure if you actually saw any of these “replicas” in person they’d look and feel like pure dog shit.

  • ProductionDesignDevelopmentkid

    you do realize your pushing traffic their way by giving them a mention? i am confused as to which side your choosing or are you simply stating opinionated facts?

    • Lawrence

      Simply stating facts overall, but I think Jake makes it pretty clear where he stands: “I’d like to believe it undermines the hard work designers and their colleagues do every single day.”

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kam-kam-Redwood/100002511706615 Kam-kam Redwood

    Yo, the fakes look 10 times better no lie..real talk

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/David-Jordan/1177213638 David Jordan

    all the traffic you pushed their way seems to have crashed their server.

    • Jake Woolf

      #Influencers

  • Lindsey

    You can’t say shit like “…the second or third worst level of Dante’s Inferno of lames” and not have a corresponding article discussing the entirety of Dante’s Inferno of menswear lames.

  • Sean

    Think you just crashed their site.

  • Kieran

    Who. Gives. A. Fuck? Way to get all butt hurt over some ugly ass knock offs of some ugly ass originals. “I’d like to believe it undermines the hard work designers and their colleagues do every single day.” Lolz, GTFOMF.

    • Themediabull

      You´re still a big time fashion VICTIM if you buy something fake just for the sake of the brand name. By throwing quality under the bus you´re only aspiration left is to get noticed which reeks of insecurity and a virginity yet to be lost.

      • Kieran

        Clearly, you missed my point. Also, “fashion VICTIM”? Delete this out your thesaurus, no self-respecting man would use this terminology. “There you go. Givin’ a fuck when it ain’t your turn to give a fuck.”

        • KieranLOL

          You’re a fashion VICTIM
          LIVE WITH IT

      • NikeFiend__

        Or maybe he’s like me and he loves the look that only these extremely expensive brands produce and can’t afford the real thing.

  • Anthony

    lol they have a lookbook

  • Chalokalo

    Well, take a look at Zara if you want to buy fakes. They are almost worse than fabrixquare because they make so much money out of ripping designers off.

  • t

    I don’t know what I hate more, the writers or the people commenting.

  • Damenius

    Hahaha, laughed so hard. The “Rick Owens” fakes are not even Rick rippoffs, those are some “Diet Butcher Slim Skin” fakes you fuckin idiot.

    • Lawrence

      If not knowing the difference between the two makes you a fucking idiot, I can easily picture you dying alone.

  • jack

    ” Sites like Fabrixquare not only stand to destroy this dynamic, but also undermine everyone who supports their favorite high-end brands by buying the merchandise through the proper channels. ” sounds like something worth doing

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=682140954 Frank Meneses Jr

      Agreed. People who buy authentic shit and rip on people who buy fake shit have a rod up their ass. What does it matter to you if someone chooses to wear fakes? If they’re a good person it shouldn’t matter. Its just shallow to judge someone on the label they wear. Fucking joke.

  • http://twitter.com/dennisblaney Dennis

    i’m about to buy so much shit from this site. no remorse.

  • IvyLeaf

    Serves the brands right for producing ugly-ass fashion shit. Except maybe that dago brand. Maybe.

  • http://twitter.com/GOGO8bit GOGO

    Almost all of the items on Fabrixsquare can be found on eBay anyway.

  • Anthony

    This has to be one of the most pretentious things I’ve read in a while. You’re basically saying that high Couture clothing is expensive so that only the rich can afford it and basically telling anyone that can’t to go fuck themselves and know their place. Its a garment. Name means nothing to a practical human being. I want something well made and good looking for as cheap as possible. If someone told me expensive apples were the new status of wealth, I’d still be eating the same, cheap apples that I have since I was a kid and I bet 99% of the population would agree.

  • Ian

    I can’t get behind those Thom Browne wingtips (real of fake) because they look like they were made from polished xfl footballs.

  • http://twitter.com/taylorstic taylor bonostro

    amen… if you can’t afford the real shit, then don’t…. just get somethin else, not knock-offs

  • Davey

    “And if you’re major complaint is that the real thing is too expensive for any “average” person to be able to buy, then you need to wake up and realize that’s kind of the point. Fashion is not a democracy. ”
    This is the best quote I have read in a while on the subject – great thoughts. The tendency to hate on luxury is unfortunate – knock-offs and their patrons have only these brands to thank for their existence.

  • swagjeusus

    a lot of these high end designers are making their products ridiculously high when in actuality it doesnt cost that much to make,ur basically paying for the name(not so much quality) and while fashion is getting ever more popular ppl are still not going to pay full retail. so as a result the imitation industry strives.

  • Silas

    This is kind of stupid knowing that one of Rick Owens first jobs was remaking versace and high label brands. Rick Owens essentially started as a knock off fashion designer.

  • Queef Richards

    Both look wack in every example

  • fakename

    An introductory economics class will explain to you that-knocks off help the fashion industry, not hurt. Everything, from free advertisement on certain styles, to those who can afford the real thing buying more, newer fashions. The numbers have clearly shown that since the 30′s, the fashion industry has constantly grown, even during recessions, BECAUSE OF, not in spite of knock-offs.